Something with rain and bows

Post-Mockingjay AU - Peeta and Katniss’ daughter learns about the Hunger Games

tonidorsay:

blue-author:

oolongearlgrey:

theangryviolinist:

Made rebloggable by request.

I needed this 

Not to take away from the context, but I’ve found this applies to writing.

It applies to everything…

tonidorsay:

blue-author:

oolongearlgrey:

theangryviolinist:

Made rebloggable by request.

I needed this 

Not to take away from the context, but I’ve found this applies to writing.

It applies to everything…

meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source
Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.
The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.
Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.
It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source

Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.

The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.

Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.

It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

A weird thing I find incredibly helpful for art/writing.

heecawroo:

deadcantdraw:

Eplans.com is a website that sells blueprints for houses. 

This might not seem that helpful but if you want a characters house you can make selections based on what sort of house you want them to live in. 

image

Then browse through the results and find the house you want. Then you can view the blueprints and have a room layout for that house, which can help with visualising the space they live in. 

image

It makes describing generic homes so much easier.

thank you

John announces that he and Sherlock are together on his blog, and one of the first comments is "so you're gay now?" And Sherlock absolutely tears the commenter to shreds with a three paragraph response about bi-erasure that goes viral within the next 24 hours.
Anonymous

vowofsherlock:

This is my dream in two sentences 

seraphica:

Master Ark’s Medieval Jewelry [via]

ccushty:

punkgender:

one of the worst things about becoming educated on social issues is when people are like ‘you used to have a sense of humor’

no i used to have internalized prejudices which i’ve worked really hard to overcome and i realize now that your jokes are shitty

aos-skimmons:

that-big-gay-impala:

THE SARCASM IN THIS POST IN LETHAL

woman mothers.

aos-skimmons:

that-big-gay-impala:

THE SARCASM IN THIS POST IN LETHAL

woman mothers.

claudiaboleyn:

Stand and Burn

written and performed by Claudia Boleyn. 

(x)

omgthatdress:

Corset
1884
The Chicago History Museum

IT S A TARDIS

omgthatdress:

Corset

1884

The Chicago History Museum

IT S A TARDIS

reflectingblue:

raakellars:

bansheeandahunter:

False rape accusations are an anomaly.

True rape accusations are a norm.

You’re, quite literally, more likely to be killed by a comet than falsely accused of rape.

Re-blog now, read later.

"Because 1 in 33 men will be raped in his lifetime, men are 82,000x more likely to be raped than falsely accused of rape. It seems many of us would do well to pay more attention to how rape culture affects us all than be paranoid about false accusers.”

The social construction of childhood

tonidorsay:

This is a really, really interesting subject for those who would like to examine what a social construct is and what it means when someone says something is a social construct.

Over the course of around 275 years — the first hundred of which was really, really, really slow — the culture in the region that would become the United States changed dramatically and a major part of that was the social construction of childhood.

in 1750, a woman was adult on the day she had her first menses.  She was expected, at that point, to marry and start making babies within about the next 5 years.  A man was an adult when he could speak his mind well, shoot straight, fight bravely, and pull a damn plow. That was usually around the age of 13.

If you were wealthy, you could put that off until you were in your mid teens (15, 16), and if you were a young man you could look forward to an education that for the most part was too expensive for daughters to be granted.  Most of the time, a financial arrangement was made whereby you effectively became the property of another adult, for the purpose of learning a means of making money (apprenticeship) — and children were not apprentices.  Only adults were.

Romeo and Juliet, it should be noted, were for all intents and purposes considered adults in the time they lived. Unwise, out of control, and foolish, but still adults. Can you imagine what horrors would be raised if an actual film starred them at the ages they are in the play was produced?

Almost inevitably, it was accidents that changed the process of seeing children as adults. Mine accidents where minor miners were killed in large groups (because they were smaller and could fit in tighter areas), fires in the textile industry that employed women and children, though, really, at the time, they were just young adults for the most part, but did still have kids involved under the age of 13.

And that was similar to why school traditionally lets out in summer — to allow the kids to work in the fields, because you start working the farm at the age of 6.

The loss of young lives — lives that hadn’t even had a chance to make a mark and all that — slowly affected the way that we see the concept of “minor”.

THe age of consent began to creep up from 12 to 14, 15, 16.  In some states, it still is that low. But never before had their been laws about it — suddenly you had a law about that.  Contracts were suddenly voided because people who had signed a binding contract at the age of 14 for a payment in full on a shipment of seed were no longer able to do so.

The deplorable conditions of factories led to massive fires and tremendous changes and if you want to know what really did it, and why the concept of “sweatshops” has such a strong and powerful ring, or why the initial unions were the creations of women, you look up fire, new york city, sweatshop.

By 1920, a person was a child until they were in their 20’s, but starting to get free by the age of 16, for the most part.  From there, it just got more and more structured around the ideas of protect them, favor them, and even the notion of how important they were and the pride that a mother should take in being a mother (a role that wasn’t even on the table in the 1700’s — you were a wife as your job) all of that came about from the way that culturally we constructed childhood.

This isn’t meant to be a primer on it, this is just meant you get you interested in going out and doing the research on your own.  To learn how a social construction comes into being, and how it fills and often creates niches within a social milieu, and how it becomes part of the fabric of a society, intertwined with everything else it touches.

Anyone who says that a social construction doesn’t exist, is talking out their ass.  They do not understand this stuff. They don’t realize the power of something.  Social constructions are incredibly real — often even tangible (see: money).

Tell them that.  Don’t merely ignore them or laugh at them.  Tell them that social constructions are very real.  Tell them that they can be both incredibly powerful and very useful, as well as bad.

tonidorsay:

What Is Series of posts relating to particular concepts often completely misunderstood and so spoken about by people who know nothing about them.

Very useful in understanding some of the arguments used against trans people, and how it is that they are functionally based in the ignorance, incompetence, and animosity of the people arguing.

Concepts currently explained:

  1. Transphobia
  2. Privilege
  3. Stigma
  4. Violence against trans people
  5. Identity
  6. Identity politics
  7. Gender Identity
  8. Genderism/Genderist
  9. Socialization
  10. The problems with Gender abolition
  11. Sexual Identity
  12. Key facts about trans people
  13. What feels like a woman means
  14. microaggressions
  15. Gender Roles
  16. Gender Roles in relation to TERF ideology
  17. Agency
  18. Social constructs

The list will expand as additional concepts are outlined. Roughly twice per week.

The What Is Series

Additional Useful Information:

Introduction to Transness (PDF)

Feminism, social justice, radical feminism, transgender, trans, racism, radfem, radical feminism, TERF, Gender, Sexism, Misogyny, Toni D’orsay 

If there is a particular concept you would like to see explained in more depth, feel free to suggest.